Ward & Payne Aristocrat Chisels

So far as I can discover the Ward & Payne Aristocrat chisel is the only chisel ever to have been granted a Design Award.   The Council of Industrial Design (CoID) granted the award in 1959: The CoID was set up by the British Government as part of its plan for post-war reconstruction.   In a remarkable piece … Read more

Chisel Types

We are all familiar with chisels: simple tools made from a long piece of steel with a bevelled cutting edge and a handle which is struck or pushed in order to cut or shape wood, stone or metal.  Is there much more to say on the matter?  Of course there is!  Here is a list … Read more

the ‘Twentieth Century’ vice

Following the last few posts on the history of the quick release vice that covered the major developments in the UK over the past 100 years or so, here are a couple of honourable  mentions. the ‘Twentieth Century’ vice a memorable face design: The main aspects of this unusual vice’s history were uncovered by a … Read more

the Record 52 1/2 vice

The Record trademark has long been associated with the woodworker’s quick release vice of choice and for a while in the earlier part of the the 20th century they created a model that has arguably never been bettered in either design nor quality1)incidentally, the Record woodworker’s vices were available 3 jaw widths: 7”, 9” and … Read more

Smith & Marks Standard Instantaneous Grip Vice

You may recall from an earlier post that Francis Young – writing in the early 1880s – recommended a couple of the first ever quick-release vices. We covered the first – the Entwisle & Kenyon  ‘lightening’ instantaneous grip – in the previous post, and the second is the ‘Standard’ instantaneous grip vice,  made by Smith, … Read more

Entwisle & Kenyon’s Instantaneous Grip Parallel Vice

The next two articles are about a couple of important quick-release vices that predate Parkinson’s design: Entwisle & Kenyon’s (Accrington) Instantaneous Grip Parallel Vice the Standard Instantaneous Grip invented by Smiths Marks & Co, Keighley and sold by Thomas Syers and co. Both vices are described by Francis Young in Everyman His Own Mechanic. which was originally … Read more