bench planes

bench planes – thick or thin irons?

From the time they were introduced in the 1860s by Leonard Bailey, until recently, metal bench planes were supplied with thin irons. ...

bench planes – tapered or parallel blades?

This article is about wooden planes, but there is an interesting parallel between the blade choices available to wooden plane users...

bench planes – honing

Once you’ve ground the blade to to about the right angle then you need to hone it in order to create a...

bench planes – sharpening angles

Once you have established the rough shape of the bevel (see previous post) the next step, referred to as honing or...

bench planes – grinding

Working on the bevel – the mechanical approach There are two basic techniques – the first method I’ll describe is the...

bench planes – preparing the iron

Sharpening the iron – part I – options for preparing the face of the plane iron. A quick trawl of the...

bench planes – flattening the sole

In the previous post we found out how to check your plane’s sole for flatness.   If you buy a new...

bench planes – how flat does the sole need to be?

Given the function of bench planes, it is unsurprising that the sole of your plane should be flat but views differ...

bench planes – the cap iron

You might recall that the cap iron is the steel metal part that is held on top of the cutting iron with a...

Setting up and sharpening bench planes (intro)

Here is what I discovered about setting up and sharpening bench planes. If you read some of the many bench plane discussions on...

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